Daily Archives: May 3, 2017

School Nutrition Laws Confuse Fundraising Groups

Do you know the laws of your regarding foods allowed on High School campuses for fundraising purposes? Chances are that you have no idea. The average person having no idea really isn’t a surprise. What is a surprise is that most teachers, coaches and even administrators aren’t entirely clear on what is allowed and what isn’t as they search for healthy fundraising solutions.

The reason for this is that we are in the midst of great change in schools districts across the country. Laws are being passed at the state level as you read this mandating what may and may not be present in terms of food. Adding to the confusion, School districts have individual specific nutrition or “wellness” policies, which are often slightly different than state policies. Additionally, there are USDA policies which are also slightly different. If you’re shaking your head in confusion, you’re not alone.

The good news in all of this is that things are getting better. Whereas candy and junk food has been pervasive on High School campuses for years, it will soon be a thing of the past as schools seek healthy fundraising solutions. The difficult aspect for teachers, coaches and other school leaders is running the nutrition gauntlet as they seek out direct sales food fundraising products which are allowed in their states.

The first thing to do along this path is to directly seek out information applicable to you. Some good websites as you seek information are: http://www.fns.usda.gov/tn/, http://www.schoolnutrition.org/, http://www.actionforhealthykids.org/, and http://www.healthyfundraisingsolutions.com/

Next you’ll need to learn certain terms like FMNV, or Foods of Minimal Nutritional Value. Examples of these foods are candy and other junk food. These are specifically being banned in state after state. As you research, you’ll find the most commonly prescribed criteria that foods on campus must meet are that they be: less than 35% fat, less than 35% sugar, less than 10% saturated fat, and less than 200 calories. These are USDA guidelines. However, some states regulations differ slightly. In Nevada, food items must be: less than 30% fat, less than 35% sugar, less than 10% saturated fat, less than 600 mg sodium and less than 1.5 or 2.2. oz, depending on type of food. In California, it’s less than 35% fat, less than 35% sugar, less than 10% saturated fat and less than 250 calories